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davidtrump

What Is Diabetes Insipidus?

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How Does It Affect You?

Your body makes a substance called antidiuretic hormone (ADH). It’s produced in a part of your brain called the hypothalamus and stored in your pituitary gland. It tells your kidneys to hold onto water, which makes your urine more concentrated.

When you’re thirsty or slightly dehydrated, ADH levels rise. Your kidneys reabsorb more water and put out concentrated urine. If you’ve had plenty to drink, ADH levels fall and what comes out is clear and dilute.

When your body doesn’t make enough ADH, the condition is called central diabetes insipidus. If you make enough but your kidneys can't respond to it, you have nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

In either form, the result is the same. Your kidneys can't retain water, so even if you’re dehydrated, they'll put out a lot of pale, or diluted urine.

What Are the Symptoms?

When your kidneys can’t conserve water, you’ll:

Get really thirsty
Pee a lot -- this is known as polyuria
Some people get dehydrated.

If you lose too much water, you could have:

Unexplained weakness
Lethargy
Muscle pains
Irritability

 

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Thanks For Sharing useful information with us.

Diabetes insipidus is a condition that results from insufficient production of the antidiuretic hormone (ADH), a hormone that helps the kidneys and body conserve the correct amount of water.

 

 

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