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lindagray

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  1. lindagray

    A Woman in Pharmacy

    US Woman Pharmacist in California
  2. lindagray

    Emergency Room in California

    Emergency Room is a medical treatment facility specializing in emergency medicine, the acute care of patients who present without prior appointment; either by their own means or by that of an ambulance. The emergency department is usually found in a hospital or other primary care center.
  3. lindagray

    Women Fitness

    Album dedicated to Women Fitness. Save here the fitness photos for women in your gym
  4. lindagray

    Breast Cancer

    Breast cancer is cancer that develops from breast tissue. Signs of breast cancer may include a lump in the breast, a change in breast shape, dimpling of the skin, fluid coming from the nipple, a newly inverted nipple, or a red or scaly patch of skin.
  5. lindagray

    Acupuncture

    Studies have documented acupuncture's effects, but they have not been able to fully explain how acupuncture works within the framework of the Western system of medicine.
  6. What heart attack symptoms are more common in women? Women are more likely than men to have a different symptom of heart attack than chest pain or discomfort. These symptoms include: Pain in the back, neck, jaw, or throat Indigestion Heartburn Nausea (feeling sick to the stomach) Vomiting Extreme fatigue (tiredness) Problems breathing (shortness of breath) Women are more likely than men to have heart attacks that do not show obvious symptoms. These are called silent heart attacks. All women should know and talk about their risk factors for heart attack with their doctor or nurse. What should I do if I have heart attack symptoms? If you think you, or someone else, may be having a heart attack, call 911 right away. Do not drive yourself to the hospital, and do not let a friend drive you. You may need medical help on the way to the hospital. Ambulance workers are trained to treat you on the way to the emergency room. Getting to the hospital quickly is important. Treatments for opening clogged arteries work best within the first hour after a heart attack starts. If you think you're having a heart attack, get emergency help right away. Don't let anyone tell you that you are overreacting or to wait and see. Get tips on how best to describe your symptoms and how to ask for tests that can show whether you're having a heart attack. What is a silent heart attack? A silent heart attack is a heart attack that does not cause obvious symptoms. Your doctor may discover a silent heart attack days, weeks, or months later on an electrocardiogram test used to diagnose a heart problem. Silent heart attack: Is more common in women than in men Can happen to women younger than 65. Younger women who have silent heart attacks without chest pain are more likely to die compared to younger men who have silent heart attacks without chest pain. Is more likely to happen in women with diabetes. Diabetes can change how you sense pain, making you less likely to notice heart attack symptoms.
  7. Heart Disease and Stroke Heart disease and stroke are important health issues for all women. Heart disease is the number one killer of American women, and stroke is fourth. While heart disease is most common in older women, most women between 40 and 60 years old have at least one risk factor for heart disease. The good news is that you can lower your risk for heart disease and stroke at any age. In the United States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease in both men and women is narrowing or blockage of the coronary arteries, the blood vessels that supply blood to the heart itself. This is called coronary artery disease, and it happens slowly over time. It's the major reason people have heart attacks. Heart diseases that affect women more than men include Coronary microvascular disease (MVD) - a problem that affects the heart's tiny arteries Broken heart syndrome - extreme emotional stress leading to severe but often short-term heart muscle failure The older a woman gets, the more likely she is to get heart disease. But women of all ages should be concerned about heart disease. All women can take steps to prevent it by practicing healthy lifestyle habits. Heart attack symptoms Many people think the warning signs of a heart attack are sudden, like a movie heart attack, where someone clutches his chest and falls over. A real heart attack may look and feel very different for women. Women are more likely to have nontraditional symptoms of heart attack than men. And women are also more likely to have silent heart attacks. How do I know if I'm having a heart attack? For both women and men, the most common heart attack symptom is pain or discomfort in the center of the chest. The pain or discomfort can be mild or strong. It can last more than a few minutes, or it can go away and come back. The more heart attack symptoms that you have, the more likely it is that you are having a heart attack.1 Also, if you've already had a heart attack, your symptoms may not be the same for another one. Even if you are not totally sure you are having a heart attack, call 911 right away.
  8. Other diseases and conditions, such as lupus and rheumatoid arthritis, can also increase a woman’s risk of heart disease. According to new guidelines released by the AHA, illnesses linked to a higher risk of cardiovascular disease should now be incorporated into a woman’s overall risk factor evaluation. Physical inactivity is a significant risk factor for heart disease, yet millions of Americans still don’t exercise at all. Many studies have shown that exercise reduces the risk of heart attack and stroke, increases HDL cholesterol levels, regulates glucose, lowers blood pressure, and increases the flexibility of arteries. Exercise has also been shown to reduce mental stress as well. You can benefit from exercising even it is only for 30 minutes a day, at least three times a week, but more will reap better benefits. Oral contraceptives (birth control pills) may pose an increased cardiovascular risk for women, especially those with other risk factors such as smoking. Researchers believe that birth control pills raise blood pressure and blood sugar levels in some women, as well as increase the risk of blood clots. The risks associated with birth control pills increase as women get older. Women should tell their doctors about any other cardiovascular risk factors they have before they begin taking birth control pills. Excessive alcohol intake can contribute to obesity, raise triglyceride and blood pressure levels, cause heart failure, and lead to stroke. Although studies have shown that the risk of heart disease in people who drink moderate amounts of alcohol is lower than in nondrinkers, this does not mean that nondrinkers should start drinking alcohol or that those who do drink should increase the amount they drink. For women, a moderate amount of alcohol is an average of one drink per day. Stress is considered a contributing risk factor for both sexes, especially as it leads to other risk factors such as smoking and overeating. Depression can affect how women deal with their health issues or follow their doctor’s advice. According to American Heart Association guidelines, depression screening should now be part of an overall evaluation of women for cardiovascular risk. Many risk factors that contribute to heart disease can be controlled. Quitting smoking, losing weight, exercising, lowering cholesterol and blood pressure, controlling diabetes, and reducing stress are within every woman’s grasp.
  9. Cholesterol levels are also related to a person’s risk of heart disease. Doctors look at how your levels of LDL, HDL, and fats called triglycerides relate to each other and to your total cholesterol level. Before menopause, women in general have higher cholesterol levels than men because estrogen increases HDL levels in the blood. A study reported in the American Journal of Cardiology found that HDL levels were the most important predictor of cardiovascular health. That is, the higher a woman’s HDL level, the less likely she is to have a cardiovascular event such as heart attack or stroke. But after menopause, HDL levels tend to drop, increasing the risk of heart disease. HDL and LDL cholesterol levels can be improved by diet, exercise, and, in serious cases, statins or other cholesterol-lowering medicines. Obesity is a strong predictor for heart disease, especially among women. A person is considered obese if body weight exceeds the “desirable” weight for height and gender by 20 percent or more. Where fat settles on the body is also an important predictor. Women who have a lot of fat around the waist are at greater risk than those who have fat around the hips. In the United States, about one third of women are classified as obese. A plan of diet and exercise approved by your doctor is the best way to safely lose weight. Diabetes is more common in overweight, less active women and poses a greater risk because it cancels the protective effects of estrogen in premenopausal women. Results of one study showed that women with diabetes have a higher risk of death from cardiovascular disease than men with diabetes have. The increased risk may also be explained by the fact that most diabetic patients tend to be overweight and physically inactive, have high cholesterol levels, and are more likely to have high blood pressure. Proper management of diabetes is important for cardiovascular health
  10. Modifiable Risk Factors for Women Women need to be aware of the risk factors for cardiovascular disease and the importance of making lifestyle changes that may reduce those risks. Factors such as race, increasing age, and a family history of heart disease cannot be changed. Other risk factors, however, can be changed or eliminated by making informed decisions about cardiovascular health. Smoking is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Although the overall number of adult smokers has decreased in this country during the last 20 years, the number of teenaged girls who smoke has increased. Cigarette smoking combined with the use of birth control pills greatly increases the risk of heart attack or stroke. The good news is that no matter how long or how much someone has smoked, smokers can immediately reduce their risk of heart attack by quitting. After 1 year of not smoking, the excess risk of heart disease created by smoking is reduced 80%; after 7 years of not smoking, all the risk from smoking is gone. It is never too late to stop smoking. High blood pressure, or hypertension is a silent disease. If left untreated, it makes the heart work harder, speeds up hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis), and increases the risk of heart attack, stroke, and kidney failure. Women who have a history of high blood pressure, black women with high blood pressure, and overweight women with high blood pressure are also at greater risk. Although high blood pressure cannot be cured, it can be controlled with diet, exercise, and, if necessary, medicines. High blood pressure is a lifelong risk and requires effective long-term management, including regular blood pressure checks and the appropriate medicines. Pregnancy may trigger high blood pressure, especially during the third trimester, but high blood pressure caused by pregnancy usually goes away after childbirth. This is called pregnancy-induced hypertension. Another form of high blood pressure that can occur during pregnancy is called preeclampsia, and it is usually accompanied by swelling and increased protein in the urine. Women with a history of preeclampsia face double the risk of stroke, heart disease and dangerous clotting in their veins during the 5 to 15 years after pregnancy.
  11. Estrogen and Heart Disease Studies have shown that after menopause, women experience an increased risk of heart disease. Researchers have connected this pattern to decreasing levels of the female hormone estrogen during menopause—a process that begins around age 50. Estrogen is associated with higher levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL or “good cholesterol”) and lower levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL or “bad cholesterol”). Withdrawal of the natural estrogen that occurs in menopause leads to lower “good cholesterol” and higher “bad cholesterol” thus increasing the risk of heart disease. Because the life expectancy for women in the United States is 79 years, women can expect to live a large part of their lives with an increased risk of heart disease. In fact, 1 out of 4 women older than 65 has some form of identified heart disease. Researchers have looked at how hormone replacement therapy (HRT) may affect women who already have heart disease and those who don’t. After several years of study and numerous clinical trials with differing results, the AHA still does not advise women to take HRT to reduce the risk of coronary heart disease or stroke. Women should weigh the risks of HRT and discuss them with their doctor. For the symptoms of menopause, including bone loss, effective non-hormonal treatments are available.
  12. Types of Health Coverage There are many types of health coverage such as PPOs, EPOs and HMOs. Each one is a little different. Read below for more information. Preferred Provider Organizations (PPOs) Which doctors, hospitals and other providers can I use? You can see "preferred" providers or "out-of-network" providers A PPO has a network (or group) of preferred providers. You pay less if you go to these providers. Preferred providers are also called in-network providers. With a PPO, you can go to a doctor or hospital that is not on the preferred provider list. This is called going out-of-network. However, you pay more to go out-of-network. The PPO pays less or nothing at all. When you are shopping for insurance, be sure to ask what hospitals, doctors, and other providers are "preferred" or "in-network". What are my costs if I have a PPO? Cost can vary. It depends on the providers you go to. If you stay in the PPO's preferred provider network, your costs are less. If you choose to go to a provider outside the PPO network, you pay much more. Before you see an out-of-network provider, check with your PPO to find out what is and what is not covered. Where can I go if I have a problem? If you have a PPO, and have a question or want to file a complaint, call 1-800-927-4357 (HELP). Providers can also get help on our Health Provider Complaint page for complaints about things like improper denial of claims or payment delays. In some cases, Department of Managed Health Care (DMHC) regulates PPOs. For those, you will need to contact DMHC for help. If you are not sure who to call, contact the California Department of Insurance at 1-800-927-4357 (HELP). Exclusive Provider Organization (EPOs) Which doctors, hospitals and other providers can I use? You must use providers in the EPO network. Generally, you do not have to use a primary care doctor. Most of the time, you do not need to get referrals to see specialists who are in-network. EPOs can have many limits on the doctors or hospitals you can use. With an EPO, you can use the doctors and hospitals within the EPO's network. However, you cannot go outside the network for covered care. If you do go out-of-network, your EPO will not pay for any services. The only exception is if you have an emergency or urgent care situation. What are my costs if I have a EPO? Cost can vary. It depends on the providers you see. If you stay in the EPO's preferred provider network, your costs are less because you will be reimbursed for the health care you get. Like PPOs, you pay a percentage of every medical bill up to a certain level. If you decide to see a doctor outside the EPO network, you must pay for the full medical bill. Where can I go if I have a problem? If you have a EPO, contact us for help. In some cases, the Department of Managed Health Care (DMHC) handles EPOs. If you are not sure who to call, call our Hot Line (1-800-927-4357). Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs) Which doctors, hospitals and other providers can I use? You must use providers in the HMO network. Usually, you must have a primary care doctor. This doctor provides your basic care and makes referrals to specialists. If you see a provider outside of your HMO's network, they will not pay for those services (except in the case of emergency and urgent care). The doctors and other providers may be employees of the HMO or they may have contracts with the HMO. To join an HMO, you must live in the area the HMO services. Outside this area you can only get emergency or urgent care. What are my costs if I have an HMO? Usually you pay a flat co-pay each time you see a doctor or fill a prescription. You may also pay a co-insurance for some services. Co-insurance is a part or percentage of the cost, such as 20%. Where can I go if I have a problem with my coverage? If you have an HMO, call their Help Center at 1-888-466-2219.
  13. Group Coverage: Information for Employees Here are some things that you should know about your employer-based coverage Your employer may offer one group policy or several. You may have to pay part of your premium. You may pay all of the premiums for your dependents if your employer offers dependent coverage. Employers cannot impose a waiting period for coverage on new employees. Ask your employer about the deadline for choosing health coverage. Each year, usually in the fall, employers have an open enrollment period. This is when employees can sign up for or change their coverage for the next year. If your employer offers more than one policy, you can only change it: during open enrollment; and if you have certain life events such as moving to a new state, getting married or having a child. . How do I choose between plans? Start by asking these questions: What are the costs? Which providers and doctors can I see? What are the benefits? What is the quality? Considerations When Purchasing Health Insurance Fortunately, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) makes it easier to get the right health coverage. All health insurance companies in California sell policies with a standard set of benefits (Essential Health Benefits) and fixed cost sharing (except for grandfathered plans). This makes it easier for consumers to shop for health coverage. It's like comparing apples-to-apples. Some insurers also offer an alternate plan design. These may have more benefits and the cost sharing may vary. Below are four things you should think about when choosing coverage - Costs, provider network, benefits, and quality. Costs When you buy individual/family coverage, your monthly premiums vary based on a few factors including your age, where you live, the number of persons covered, and how much of your coverage you will pay for out-of-pocket. It can be hard for consumers to pick which cost sharing is best for them. Premiums are calculated differently if you are getting your coverage from your employer (group coverage). Sometimes employers will provide many plans for you to choose from with different levels of cost-sharing. You also may have a choice between an PPO, EPO and HMO. Which doctors and other providers can I go to? How large is my provider network? Can I see any provider in the network? Is my current doctor in the network? If I need to choose a new doctor, are there doctors in my area accepting new patients? Will I need a referral from my doctor to see a specialist? Does the plan have hospitals and pharmacies near me? Do I need pre-approval (pre-authorization) from the plan for certain services? If I travel often, what care can I get away from home? NOTE: If you want to keep or go to a specific provider and/or hospital, check with the insurer. You will need to find if they are a part of the network for the specific product you are buying. Just because a provider is a part of that insurer's network for another plan, it does not mean that he or she will be a part of the plan that you are buying. What benefits does the plan offer? Most insurance policies now offer a standard benefits, making it easier to compare of your choices. What quality of care will I get with this coverage? How does it compare to others? The California Department of Insurance can tell you how a company ranks in complaints. You can find out how long it takes to reach a live person when call your insurer and and how many complaints the company gets. Every year, CDI shares a report card with quality information about PPOs.The California Office of the Patient Advocate (OPA) also has information on health coverage and provider quality. Categories PPO EPO HMO Network You pay less to see providers in your plan's network. These are called preferred providers. You get covered care from the doctors, hospitals, and other providers in your plan's network. You get care from the doctors, labs, and other providers in your plan's network. Out-of-Network You can go out-of-network, but you pay more. You can go out-of-network, but you will pay the full our-of-pocket costs for the service. The only exception is if you have an emergency or need urgent care. You cannot see providers out-of-network except in an emergency or if your plan gives you pre-approval. Primary Care Doctor You may not be required to have a primary care doctor. You may not have to use a primary care doctor. You must have a primary care doctor. This is the doctor you must usually see first when you need care. Referrals You may be able to get many health services without a referral. You do not need to get referrals to see specialists if they are in the EPO's network. You need referrals to see specialists or to get lab tests. Pre approval You may be able to get many health services without pre-approval. You will need pre-approval from your health plan before you can get any services. You will need pre-approval from your health plan before you can get many health services. Costs You may have a yearly deductible. You may also have deductibles for hospital care and prescription drugs. Care in the network costs a lot less than care outside the network. You are likely to have higher out of pocket expenses. You are less likely to have a yearly deductible. You usually pay a co-pay or flat fee for most services. You are less likely to have a yearly deductible. You usually pay a co-pay or flat fee for most services.
  14. Medi-Cal Medi-Cal is California's version of the federal Medicaid program. This program generally covers lower-income families and single adults. Medi-Cal is mostly provided by Managed Care Organizations and covers many medical procedures, office visits, and other health-related expenses. You do no pay for Medi-Cal. Instead, you receive it as a benefit if you qualify for it. In 2014, Medi-Cal was expanded to include single adults and Californians who earn up to 138% of the Federal poverty level. (In 2013 that would mean an individual who earned around $15,900 or less). Each County in California determines who is eligible, enrollment, and handles complaints. You can apply for Medi-Cal or get questions answered at Covered California also accepts applications and then forwards them to the County you live in so that you can get coverage. You can also contact the California Department of Health Care Services Medi-Cal Member Helpline or call 1-800-541-5555 (outside of California, please call 916-636-1980) for more information and assistance. Medi-Cal in California by Country County Name County Address / Phone / Website Alameda County Alameda County Social Services Agency 24100 Amador St. Hayward, CA 94544 (888)-999-4772 Alameda Social Services Website Alpine County Alpine County Department of Social Services 75-A Diamond Valley Road Markleeville, CA 96120 (530) 694-2235 ext. 231 Alpine Department of Social Services Website Amador County Amador County Department of Social Services 10877 Conductor Blvd Suite #200 Sutter Creek, CA 95685 (209) 223-6550 Amador Department of Social Services Website Butte County Butte County Department of Employment and Social Services 78 Table Mountain Blvd. Oroville, CA 95965 (877) 410-8803 Butte County Department of Employment and Social Services Website Calaveras County Calaveras County Health and Human Services Agency 509 East St. Charles Street San Andreas, CA 95249-9701 (209) 754-6448 Calaveras Health and Human Services Website Colusa County Colusa County Department of Social Services 251 East Webster Street Colusa, CA 95932 (530) 458-0250 Colusa Department of Social Services Website Contra Costa County Contra Costa County Employment and Human Services Dept. Workforce Services Bureau (Please call for nearest office location) (800) 709-8348 Medi-Cal Contra Costa Employment and Human Services Department Website Del Norte County Del Norte County Department of Health and Human Services 880 Northcrest Drive Crescent City, CA 95531-3485 (707) 464-3191 Del Norte Department of Health and Human Services Website El Dorado County El Dorado County Department of Social Services 3057 Briw Road, Suite A Placerville, CA 95667-1637 (530) 642-7300 Placerville Office (530) 573-3200 South Lake Tahoe Office El Dorado Department of Social Services Website Fresno County Fresno County Department of Human Services (855) 832-8082 Call Center, Toll Free (559) 600-1377 Automated Assistance Fresno Department of Human Services Website Glenn County Glenn County Health & Human Services Agency P.O. Box 611, 420 East Laurel Street Willows, CA 95988-0611 (530) 934-6514 Glenn Health and Human Services Agency Website Humboldt County Humboldt County Department of Social Services 929 Koster Street Eureka, CA 95501 (877) 410-8809 Humbolt Department of Social Services Website Imperial County Imperial County Department of Social Services 2995 South Fourth Street, Suite 105 El Centro, CA 92243 (760) 337-6800 Imperial Department of Social Services Website Inyo County Inyo County Department of Social Services 920 N Main St. Bishop, CA, 93514 (760) 872-1394 Inyo Department of Social Services Website Kern County Kern County Department of Human Services 100 E. California Avenue Bakersfield, CA 93307 (661) 631-6807 Kern Department of Human Services Website Kings County Kings County Human Services Agency 1400 W. Lacey Blvd., Building #8 Hanford, CA 93230 (877) 410-8813 Toll Free Kings Human Services Agency Website Lake County Lake County Department of Social Services 15975 Anderson Ranch Parkway P.O. Box 9000 Lower Lake, CA 95457-9000 (707) 995-4200 Lake Department of Social Services Website Lassen County Lassen County Lassen WORKS Business and Career Network 1616 Chestnut St Susanville, CA 96130 (530) 251-8152 Lassen Health and Social Services Website Los Angeles County Los Angeles County Department of Public Social Services Customer Service Center (866) 613-3777 (626) 569-1399 (310) 258-7400 (818) 701-8200 (Search for the nearest District office to Apply) Los Angeles Department of Public Social Services Website Madera County Madera County Department of Social Services 720 E. Yosemite Avenue Madera, CA 93639-0569 (559) 675-2300 Madera County Social Services Website Marin County Marin County Dept. of Health & Human Services (Public Assistance) 120 N. Redwood Dr. -West Wing San Rafael, CA 94903 (877) 410-8817 Marin County Health and Human Services Website Mariposa County Mariposa County Department of Human Services 5362 Lemee Lane PO Box 99 Mariposa, CA 95338 (209) 966-2000 (800) 549-6741 Toll Free Mariposa Human Services Website Mendocino County Mendocino County Health and Human Services Fort Bragg Office: 764 S. Franklin Street Fort Bragg, CA 95482 (707) 962-1000 Ukiah Office: 737 South State Street, P.O. Box 8508 Ukiah, CA 95482 (707) 463-7700 Medocino Health and Human Services Website Merced County Merced County Human Services Agency 2115 West Wardrobe Avenue Merced, CA 95341 (209) 385-3000 Merced Human Services Website Modoc County Modoc County Department of Social Services 120 North Main Street Alturas , CA 96101 (530) 233-6501 Modoc Social Services Website Mono County Mono County Department of Social Services South County Office: 452 Old Mammoth Rd, 3rd Floor, P.O. Box 2969 Mammoth Lakes, CA 93546 (760) 924-1770 North County Office: 85 Emigrant Street, P.O. Box 576 Bridgeport, CA 93517 (760) 932-5600 Mono Social Services Website Monterey County Monterey County Department of Social Services 1000 South Main Street- Suite 216 Salinas, CA 93901 1-877-410-8823 Toll Free Monterey Social Services Website Napa County Napa County Department of Health and Human Services 2751 Napa Valley Corporate Drive Napa, CA 94558-Napa, CA 94558-6216 (800) 464-4214 Toll Free (707) 253-4511 Napa Health and Human Services Website Nevada County Nevada County Health and Human Services Agency 950 Maidu Avenue, P.O. Box 1210 Nevada City, CA 95959 (530) 265-1340 (888) 809-1340 Toll Free Nevada Health and Human Services Agency Website Orange County Orange County Social Services Agency (Call for the nearest district office) (800) 281-9799 To apply for benefits or Existing Clients (949) 389-8456 24-Hour Automated Assistance (714) 541-4895 24-Hour Automated Assistance Orange Social Services Agency Website Placer County Placer County Health and Human Services Auburn Office: 11542 B. Ave Auburn, CA 95603 Rocklin Office: 1000 Sunset Blvd. Suite 220 Rocklin, CA 95765 North Tahoe Office: 5225 North Lake Blvd. Carnelian Bay, CA 96140 (888) 385-5160 Toll Free (916) 784-6000 If you are outside the County Placer Health and Human Services Website Plumas County Plumas County Dept. of Social Services 270 County Hospital Rd, Suite 207 Quincy, CA 95971 (530) 283-6350 Plumas Social Service Website Riverside County Riverside County Department of Public Social Services (Call for the nearest district office) (877) 410-8827 Toll Free Riverside Public Social Services Website Sacramento County Sacramento County Department of Human Assistance 1725 28th Street Sacramento, 95816-9915 (916) 874-3100 (209) 744-0499 Sacramento Human Assistance Website San Benito County San Benito County Human Services Agency 1111 San Felipe Rd, Ste 206 Hollister, CA 95023-3801 (831) 636-4180 San Benito Human Services Agency Website San Bernardino County San Bernardino Human Services System Transitional Assistance Department (Call for nearest district office) (877) 410-8829 San Bernardino Human Services Website San Diego County San Diego County Dept. of Health & Human Services Agency (Call for the nearest district Office) (866) 262-9881 San Diego Health and Human Services Website City & County of San Francisco San Francisco Human Services Agency SF Benefits Net 1440 Harrison St San Francisco, CA 94120 (415) 558-4700 (855) 355-5757 Toll Free San Francisco Human Services Website San Joaquin County San Joaquin County Human Services Agency 333 E. Washington Street Stockton, CA 95202 (209) 468-1000 San Joaquin Human Services Agency San Luis Obispo County San Luis Obispo Department of Social Services 3433 S. Higuera Street San Luis Obispo, CA 93403 (805) 781-1600 San Luis Obiispo Social Services Website San Mateo County San Mateo County Human Services Agency 400 Harbor Boulevard, Building "B" Belmont, CA 94002 (800) 223-8383 Toll Free San Mateo Human Services Website Santa Barbara County Santa Barbara County Department of Social Services 234 Camino Del Remedio Santa Barbara, CA 93110 (866) 404-4007 Toll Free Santa Barbara Social Services Website Santa Clara County Santa Clara County Social Services Agency Assistance Application Center 1867 Senter Road San Jose, CA 95112 (408) 758-3800 (877) 962-3633 Automated Santa Clara Social Services Website Santa Cruz County County of Santa Cruz Human Services Department 1020 Emeline Ave. Santa Cruz, Ca 95060 18 W. Beach Street Watsonville, CA 95076 (888) 421-8080 Santa Cruz Human Services Website Shasta County Shasta County Health & Human Services Agency 2460 Breslauer Way, P.O. Box 496005 Redding, CA 96001 (877) 652-0731 Shasta Health and Human Services Website Sierra County Sierra County Social Services 202 Front Street, P.O. Box 1019 Loyalton, CA 96118 (530) 993-6721 Downieville: (530) 289-3711 Sierra Social Services Website Siskiyou County Siskiyou County Health and Human Services Agency 818 S. Main Street Yreka, CA 96097 (530) 841-2700 Siskiyou Health and Human Services Website Solano County Solano County Health and Social Services Medi-Cal and County Medical Services Program (CMSP) (Call for the nearest office) Office Locations: Fairfield: (707) 784-8050 Vacaville: (707) 469-4500 Vallejo: (707) 553-5000 Solano Health and Social Services Website Sonoma County Sonoma County Human Services Department 2550 Paulin Drive P.O. Box 1539 Santa Rosa, CA 95402-1539 (877) 699-6868 Sonoma Human Services Website Stanislaus County Stanislaus County Community Services Agency 251 East Hackett Road, P.O. Box 42 95353 Modesto, CA 95355 (877) 652-0734 Stanislaus Community Services Website Sutter County Sutter County Department of Human Services Welfare Social Services Division 539 Garden Highway, P.O. Box 1535, Yuba City, CA 95991 (877) 652-0735 Sutter Human Services Website Tehama County Tehama County Department of Social Services 310 South Main Street, P.O. Box 1515, Red Bluff, CA 96080 (530) 527-1911 Tehama Social Services Website Trinity County Trinity County Dept. of Health and Human Services #51 Industrial Parkway, P.O. Box 1470, Weaverville, CA 96093-1470 (530) 623-1265 (800) 851-5658 Toll Free Trinity Health and Human Services Website Tulare County Tulare County Health & Human Services Agency (Call for nearest Office) (800) 540-6880 Toll Free Tulare Health and Human Services Website Tuolumne County Tuolumne County Department of Social Services 20075 Cedar Road North Sonora, CA 95370 (209) 533-5711 Tuolumne Social Services Website Ventura County Ventura County Human Services Agency 855 Partridge Drive Ventura, CA 93003 (888) 472-4463 Toll Free Ventura County Human Services Agency Website Yolo County Yolo County Health and Human Services Agency Woodland Office 25 North Cottonwood Street Woodland, CA 95695 West Sacramento Office 500-A Jefferson Boulevard West Sacramento, CA 95605 Winters Office 111 East Grant Avenue Winters, CA 95694 (855) 278-1594 Yolo Health and Human Services Website Yuba County Yuba County Health and Human Services Department 5730 Packard Avenue, Suite 100, P.O. Box 2320 Marysville, CA 95901 (877) 652-0739 Yuba Health and Human Services Website
  15. Senior Health Coverage As a senior, you have many options to choose from for your health coverage. This section pulls together senior health related information all in one convenient location for you. The various senior health coverage options listed below describe some of their differences and offer links to resources for you. You should consider your personal needs and finances before making any choice. The California Department of Insurance (CDI) regulates health plans underwritten by insurance companies. That means that some of your options, like Medicare, are not regulated by CDI and you will have to contact another agency if you need help with a problem or need assistance. We have listed contact information for each option, below. Medicare Medicare is a federally funded insurance program for eligible participants 65 or over. Medicare has two parts, Part A (Hospital Insurance) and Part B (Medical Insurance). Medicare does not cover 100% of all costs. CDI recommends purchasing a Medicare Supplement Insurance policy if you have traditional Medicare to help offset your health care costs. If you have questions related to Medicare, contact Medicare or your local Department of Aging (HICAP). Medicare's official website Medicare and You (Medicare's official guide to the Medicare program) Medicare Part D (Prescription Drug Coverage) Medicare Part D is a voluntary prescription drug program for Medicare beneficiaries. Prescription drug plans are sold by private companies but must be approved by Medicare. Before you purchase a prescription drug plan, it is important to make sure the one you are considering is approved by Medicare. Drug plans can have rules about what drugs are covered in different drug categories, so you should also make sure the plan you are considering covers any brand name drugs you are currently taking and wish to continue. Information on Medicare Drug Plans can be found at Medicare's official website for Prescription Drug Coverage. Additional information on Medicare Part D can be found at: California Health Advocates ( Prescription Drugs) My Medicare Matters Social Security Online: Help With Prescription Drug Cost Medicare Supplement Insurance To purchase Medicare Supplement Insurance you must be enrolled in Medicare Part A and Part B. Medicare Supplement Insurance (also known as Medigap) provides coverage for gaps in medical costs not covered by Medicare. Medicare Supplement plans are standardized and offer various benefits to help offset your healthcare cost. The California Department of Insurance (CDI) regulates Medicare Supplement policies underwritten by licensed insurance companies. The CDI assists consumers in resolving complaints and disputes concerning premium rates, claims handling, and many other problems with agents or companies. The Consumer Hotline 800-927-4357 is serviced by experienced professionals who will answer your questions, or assist you in filing a complaint. Medicare Advantage Medicare Advantage is an alternative to traditional Medicare Part A and Part B. Medicare Advantage Plans are approved by Medicare, but are run by private companies that include Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs) or Preferred Provider Organizations (PPOs). If you have questions related to Medicare Advantage Plans, contact Medicare at 1-800-633-4227. Medicare's official site for Medicare Advantage Plans Additional information on Medicare Advantage Plans can be found at: California Health Advocates (Medicare Advantage Plans) Medi-Cal Medi-Cal is California's Medicaid program that provides health insurance for low-income individuals and families
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