Jump to content
Invision Community
FORUMS BLOG/NEWS USER BLOGS USER MEDIA ADVERTS   ADD  MANAGE CHAT CLUBS & USER PERSONAL FORUMS LINK EXCHANGE
HEALTH & DISEASES Diabetes Treatment Cancer Treatment Alzheimer's Treatment Crohn's Disease Treatment Cirrhosis Treatment Multiple Sclerosis Treatment Scleroderma Treatment Hair Loss Treatment Infertility Treatment

lancelotarnold

Administrators
  • Content Count

    55
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

0 Neutral
  1. Naturopathy is practiced in many countries and is subject to different standards of regulation and levels of acceptance. The scope of practice varies widely between jurisdictions. The practice of naturopathy is illegal in two USA states. Australia In 1977, a committee reviewed all colleges of naturopathy in Australia and found that, although the syllabuses of many colleges were reasonable in their coverage of basic biomedical sciences on paper, the actual instruction bore little relationship to the documented course. In no case was any practical work of consequence available. The lectures which were attended by the committee varied from the dictation of textbook material to a slow, but reasonably methodical, exposition of the terminology of medical sciences, at a level of dictionary definitions, without the benefit of depth or the understanding of mechanisms or the broader significance of the concepts. The committee did not see any significant teaching of the various therapeutic approaches favoured by naturopaths. People reported to be particularly interested in homoeopathy, Bach's floral remedies or mineral salts were interviewed, but no systematic courses in the choice and use of these therapies were seen in the various colleges. The committee were left with the impression that the choice of therapeutic regime was based on the general whim of the naturopath and, since the suggested applications in the various textbooks and dispensations overlapped to an enormous extent, no specific indications were or could be taught. The position of the Australian Medical Association is that "evidence-based aspects of complementary medicine can be part of patient care by a medical practitioner", but it has concerns that there is "limited efficacy evidence regarding most complementary medicine. Unproven complementary medicines and therapies can pose a risk to patient health either directly through misuse or indirectly if a patient defers seeking medical advice." The AMA's position on regulation is that "there should be appropriate regulation of complementary medicine practitioners and their activities." In 2015, the Australian government found no clear evidence of effectiveness for naturopathy. Accordingly, In 2017 the Australian government named Naturopathy as a practice that would not qualify for insurance subsidy, saying this step would "ensure taxpayer funds are expended appropriately and not directed to therapies lacking evidence". India In India, naturopathy is overseen by the Department of Ayurveda, Yoga and Naturopathy, Unani, Siddha and Homoeopathy (AYUSH); there is a 5½-year degree in "Bachelor of Naturopathy and Yogic Sciences" (BNYS) degree that was offered by twelve colleges in India as of August 2010. The National Institute of Naturopathy in Pune that operates under AYUSH, which was established on December 22, 1986 and encourages facilities for standardization and propagation of the existing knowledge and its application through research in naturopathy throughout India. North America In five Canadian provinces, seventeen U.S. states, and the District of Columbia, naturopathic doctors who are trained at an accredited school of naturopathic medicine in North America, are entitled to use the designation ND or NMD. Elsewhere, the designations "naturopath", "naturopathic doctor", and "doctor of natural medicine" are generally unprotected or prohibited. In North America, each jurisdiction that regulates naturopathy defines a local scope of practice for naturopathic doctors that can vary considerably. Some regions permit minor surgery, access to prescription drugs, spinal manipulations, midwifery (natural childbirth), and gynecology; other regions exclude these from the naturopathic scope of practice or prohibit the practice of naturopathy entirely. Canada Five Canadian provinces license naturopathic doctors: Ontario, British Columbia, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta. British Columbia has the largest scope of practice in Canada allowing certified NDs to prescribe pharmaceuticals and perform minor surgeries. United States U.S. jurisdictions that currently regulate or license naturopathy include Alaska, Arizona, California, Connecticut, Colorado, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Kansas, Maine, Maryland, Minnesota, Montana, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Oregon, Puerto Rico, US Virgin Islands, Utah, Vermont, and Washington. Additionally, Florida and Virginia license the practice of naturopathy under a grandfather clause. U.S. jurisdictions that permit access to prescription drugs: Arizona, California, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Kansas, Maine, Montana, New Hampshire, Oregon, Utah, Vermont, and Washington. U.S. jurisdictions that permit minor surgery: Arizona, District of Columbia, Kansas, Maine, Montana, Oregon, Utah, Vermont, and Washington. U.S. states which specifically prohibit the practice of naturopathy: South Carolina and Tennessee. United Kingdom Naturopathy is not regulated in the United Kingdom. In 2012, publicly funded universities in the United Kingdom dropped their alternative medicine programs, including naturopathy. Switzerland The Swiss Federal Constitution defines the Swiss Confederation and the Cantons of Switzerland within the scope of their powers to oversee complementary medicine. In particular, the Federal authorities must set up diplomas for the practice of non-scientific medicine. The first of such diplomas has been validated in April 2015 for the practice of naturopathy. There is a long tradition for naturopathy and traditional medicine in Switzerland. The Cantons of Switzerland make their own public health regulations. Although the law in certain cantons is typically monopolistic, the authorities are relatively tolerant with regard to alternative practitioners.
  2. A few naturopathic treatments have known side effects and risks: Supplements (vitamin and herbal): Some of these may interfere with prescription medications. In large doses, certain vitamins may raise your risk of a disease like cancer. Spinal adjustments: As part of naturopathic manipulative treatment, your practitioner may apply pressure to your spine. This can damage arteries, nerves, bones, and spinal discs. In rare cases, it may lead to a stroke. Detox diets: These treatments are meant to rid your body of toxins. They involve cutting out certain foods or fasting. That means going for periods without eating. This can be dangerous for people with some chronic conditions, like diabetes. If you’re on the diet for a long time, you run the risk of not getting enough vital nutrients. Tell your doctor if you’re thinking about trying naturopathy. He can make sure the treatments are safe and don’t interact with any other drugs you’re taking. You shouldn’t stop or delay your conventional medical care because of naturopathic medicine. Who Can Use It? It's a good option for people who might not find relief for their chronic illness through traditional medicine. In many cases, you can use both conventional and naturopathic medicine to treat an illness. For example, naturopathic remedies may help ease the side effects of chemotherapy. But remember to tell your regular doctor about any naturopathic treatments you’re on. And, you should tell your naturopathic doctor about your conventional medications. That way, both providers can work as a team for your health.
  3. Naturopathic medicine is used for most health issues. Some of the more common ones include: Allergies Headaches Fertility issues Digestive problems Obesity Hormonal imbalances Chronic pain Chronic fatigue syndrome In some states, licensed naturopathic doctors can perform minor surgeries, like stitching up a small wound. They can prescribe certain medications. And they might even serve as your primary care doctor. Naturopathic doctors may receive additional training in natural childbirth. You don’t have to be sick to try naturopathy. You may just want to boost your overall health or prevent an illness. Don’t use it for an emergency or issue that requires a visit to the hospital, like major surgery. Nor should it be used in place of conventional medicine for serious conditions, like cancer and heart disease.
  4. You can find people who support naturopathic medicine in hospitals, clinics, community centers, and private offices. They fall into three groups, and they all have different educations and backgrounds: Naturopathic physicians: These are also called naturopathic doctors (ND) or doctors of naturopathic medicine (NMD). They usually attend an accredited four-year, graduate-level school. They learn the same basic sciences as conventional medical doctors (MD). But they also study nutrition, psychology, and complementary therapies such as herbal medicine and homeopathy. Some states and territories require naturopathic doctors to become licensed. That means they have to pass an exam to practice and take continuing education classes. Traditional naturopaths: These practitioners don’t attend an accredited naturopathic medical school or receive a license. Their education varies widely. Healthcare providers: Some medical doctors, dentists, doctors of osteopathy, chiropractors, and nurses have training in naturopathic medicine. Many are either NDs or they studied naturopathy. Before choosing a naturopathic practitioner, ask about his education or training and your state’s licensing requirements.
  5. Naturopathic medicine is a system that uses natural remedies to help the body heal itself. It embraces many therapies, including herbs, massage, acupuncture, exercise, and nutritional counseling. Naturopathy was brought to the United States from Germany in the 1800s, but some of its treatments are centuries old. Today, it combines traditional treatments with modern science. How Does It Work? The goal of naturopathic medicine is to treat the whole person -- that means mind, body, and spirit. It also aims to heal the root causes of an illness -- not just stop the symptoms. A naturopathic doctor may spend 1 to 2 hours examining you. He’ll ask questions about your health history, stress levels, and lifestyle habits. He may order lab tests. Afterwards, he’ll discuss your personal health plan. Naturopathic medicine focuses on education and prevention, so your doctor may give you diet, exercise, or stress management tips. He might use complementary medicine -- like homeopathy, herbal medicine, and acupuncture -- in addition to naturopathic treatments. He may also use touch, such as massage and pressure, to create balance in your body. This is called naturopathic manipulative therapy.
  6. The first appointment with a naturopathic physician tends to be much longer than a conventional medical office visit-anywhere from 60 to 120 minutes. In addition, patients often complete extensive paperwork before the visit to guide the naturopathic doctor during the interview. Much of the initial visit involves listening to the patient's story. This story may have many twists and turns and involve multiple conditions or diseases. Naturopathic doctors recognize the importance of this process and allow the patient the time and space necessary to share their story. Naturopathic physicians use laboratory tests and other objective data in combination with the patient's subjective story to determine the most effective treatment. A naturopathic physician is like a tailor, trying to find the best fit for the patient. This is a genuine practice of medicine, requiring trial and error, along with patience and good communication. This process culminates in an individually tailored treatment plan that actively engages the patient in his or her health. The treatment will vary depending upon the expertise of the physician, but ample time is afforded at the end of the visit to discuss the plan and answer any questions. Follow-up visits are common to assess how well the plan fits and to make any necessary changes. Where can I find a practitioner? The American Association of Naturopathic Physicians is the primary professional association for naturopathic physicians. They maintain a national database of naturopathic physicians for patient referrals. Local health food stores often know of naturopathic practitioners in the community.
  7. Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is considered the paradigm in conventional healthcare and has been suggested as the methodology for natural medicine. The underlying foundation of EBM is the randomized controlled trial, which is very valuable in evaluating single treatments for individual diseases. There are randomized controlled trials that suggest that naturopathic treatments, such as botanical medicine, nutritional therapies, acupuncture, and physiotherapy are effective at treating some conditions, such as fibromyalgia, migraine headaches, depression, asthma, hypertension, and type II diabetes. While randomized control trials are effective at testing single treatments, they may not be the best paradigm to judge the use of multiple treatments in patients with more than one disorder or disease. For this and other reasons, some scientists have suggested that an evidence-based approach should include not only research evidence, but also clinic expertise and patient preferences (Geyman, 1998). For example, riboflavin, a B vitamin, has been proven in a randomized controlled trial to reduce the frequency and duration of migraine headaches when used for three months. Thus a naturopathic physician will often use riboflavin as part of a treatment plan, while also including other treatments based on clinical expertise. These treatments may include the use of omega-3 fatty acids to decrease inflammation or an elimination diet to identify possible food or chemical triggers. Individual patients will have different triggers-for some it could be MSG, for others it could be wheat. Noting individual responses is part of taking patient preferences into consideration. In short, naturopathic medicine is personalized medicine that does not always lend itself to a strict adherence to treatments based on randomized controlled trials alone. It is essential to test the value of individual treatments, but the actual clinical application is much more complex. (And indeed the clinical application of conventional healthcare follows a similar model: according to a recent article in the British Medical Journal, only 13% of standard tests and treatments are supported by strong evidence.)
  8. Naturopathic physicians are often successful at treating chronic conditions that don't respond to conventional medicine. This includes, but is not limited to: fatigue, pain, sleep disturbance, and digestive disorders. They are able to respond to the individual needs of patients and develop a treatment plan that includes nutritional supplements, botanical medicine, and diet therapy. Naturopathic physicians understand the art of healing, which is more than dispensing an herbal remedy or nutritional supplement. To understand the context of a patient's illness, the physician must take the time to listen to the patient's story. Effective naturopathic treatment requires patience and good communication. Most patients know what is wrong and what needs to be done, but they don't know how to translate this into an action plan. The naturopathic physician can translate the patient's story and assign priorities among the several options that may emerge. They also take time to answer the patient's questions.
  9. Naturopathic medicine follows a number of key principles: The healing power of nature: The body has an inherent ability to maintain and restore health. Naturopathic physicians facilitate this healing process by removing obstacles to cure and identifying treatments to enhance healing. Identify and treat the cause: Naturopathic physicians treat the underlying causes of illness rather than just the symptoms of disease. Symptoms are an external manifestation of an internal imbalance due to any combination of physical, mental, or emotional causes. Symptom management may be important, but it is more important not to disregard the underlying cause of disease. First do no harm: A naturopathic treatment plan uses therapies that are gentle, non-invasive, effective, and do not have adverse side effects. A conscious effort is made to use methods that do not suppress symptoms. Doctor as teacher: The Latin root of doctor is docere, which means "to teach." The primary role of naturopathic physicians is educating, empowering, and motivating patients to assume more personal responsibility for their health by adopting a healthy attitude, lifestyle, and diet. Thomas Edison once said, "The doctor of the future will give no medicine, but will interest patients in the maintenance of the human frame, in diet, and in the prevention of disease." It is more effective to teach than treat patients. Treat the whole person: Naturopathic physicians identify specific weaknesses or dysfunctions in their patients and tailor treatment based upon the patient's individual presentation. It is the patient that is in need of treatment, not the disease state or symptom. Naturopathic physicians are interested in finding and treating characteristic symptoms that define the patient rather than common symptoms that define the disease. William Osler, MD, once said, "It is more important to know what sort of patient has a disease rather than what sort of disease a patient has." Prevention: It is far easier and cheaper to prevent a disease than to treat a disease. Naturopathic physicians evaluate both subjective and objective information necessary to uncover potential susceptibilities to future disease states in their patients. They can discuss specific lifestyle strategies or nutritional supplementation as a means for disease prevention
  10. Naturopathic medicine is a science-based tradition that promotes wellness by identifying the unique aspects of each patient and then employing non-toxic natural therapies to restore his or her physiological, psychological, and structural balance. The American Association of Naturopathic Physicians (AANP) defines naturopathic medicine as: "A distinct system of primary health care-an art, science, philosophy, and practice of diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of illness. Naturopathic medicine is distinguished by the principles upon which its practice is based. These principles are continually re-examined in the light of scientific advances. The techniques of naturopathic medicine include modern and traditional, scientific, and empirical methods" (AANP, 1998). What training do naturopaths have? Naturopathic practitioners are trained as general practitioners specializing in natural medicine. They cooperate with all other branches of medical science, referring patients to other practitioners for diagnosis or treatment when appropriate (AANP, 1998). Naturopathic practitioners have a Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine (ND) degree from a four-year graduate medical college with admission requirements comparable to conventional medical schools. The ND degree requires graduate-level study in conventional medical sciences, such as cardiology, biochemistry, gynecology, immunology, pathology, pharmacology, pediatrics, and neurology. In addition to the standard medical curriculum, naturopathic students must do extensive coursework in natural therapeutics. This includes therapies from the sciences of clinical nutrition, botanical medicines, homeopathy, physical medicine, exercise therapy, lifestyle counseling, and hydrotherapy, which is the use of water to treat a disorder or disease
  11. Consumers must commit to serious research to locate the most qualified Ayurvedic practitioner. A good place to begin searching is on the International Society for Ayurveda and Health (ISAH) website at http://www.ayurvedahealth.org/ . The ISAH, which collaborates with Ayurvedic Medical Schools of India for education and training, features regional and local listings of practitioners, and offers information about their qualifications. When seeking Ayurvedic medical care, ISAH recommends partnering with a practitioner who holds a doctoral degree (e.g. MD, PhD, or PhysD) and has completed training at a recognized Ayurvedic Medical School. It is important to note that in addition to checking for provider qualifications, consumers should verify the cost of Ayurvedic therapies before beginning treatments. Some Ayurvedic therapies, such as yoga instruction, massage, and stress management techniques, are gaining wider popular recognition and are covered by many healthcare insurance plans. However, it is important to check your policy.
  12. The ancient practice of Ayurvedic medicine has clearly helped millions of people create healthier lives. However, like any other medical system, Ayurvedic therapies have contraindications and the potential for adverse effects or side effects. This is of particular concern when therapies are used incorrectly, are abused or administered improperly, or are prescribed by unqualified practitioners. Thus, consumers must take responsibility when seeking Ayurvedic therapies. It is imperative to check all practitioners’ credentials, training, and experience. Consumers must also communicate, both with their conventional and Ayurvedic practitioners. Patients must practice full disclosure about the therapies they are using, and the effects they are experiencing, to avoid potentially dangerous herbal or other therapeutic interactions. Because many Ayurvedic therapies involve herbal elements, it is important to note that the United States Food and Drug Administration does not regulate herbs or dietary supplements. The International Society for Ayurveda and Health (ISAH), a professional society of Ayurveda in the United States, recommends Ayurvedic therapeutic herbal use only when prescribed and properly supervised by a trained practitioner. Some frequently asked questions about Ayurveda’s safety include: Is there good scientific research around Ayurvedic medicine? Many Ayurvedic adherents argue that the system’s incredible longevity offers a powerful argument for its success and safety. However, most of the information regarding Ayurveda’s efficacy has been passed from teacher to student. In addition to this “oral history,” the ancient books Charak Samhita and Sushruta Samhita contain observational documentations about the system’s effectiveness. Although there is not a large body of clinical research on Ayurveda, many of the system’s principles and practices are now recognized and used in conventional medical settings. For example, the Ayurvedic tenant of the psychological and physical impact humans experience during the changing of seasons is borne out in research on SAD (seasonal affective disorder). There is also medical and layperson acknowledgement of the health benefits of Ayurvedic practices, such as yoga, massage, and meditation. Herbs used in Ayurvedic medicine, such as tumeric, ginger, and neem, are now recognized as beneficial for heart health and as antioxidant-boosters. See the References and Further Reading section below for examples of research studies that are beginning to emerge on the use of specific Ayurvedic herbs. Western knowledge of Ayurveda is still in its infancy, thus skepticism exists. As the use of Ayurvedic medicine grows, and as more practitioners share their knowledge with other healthcare providers, this wariness of Ayurveda may transform into appreciation and knowledge of the system. What are potential obstacles to conducting “traditional” scientific research within the Ayurvedic system? Like all science, Ayurvedic medicine is based upon careful observations. However, a main tenant of Ayurveda is its focus on individual treatment. Each regimen is highly customized according to each patient’s needs. Ayurveda teaches that as there are no two persons alike, individuals may be treated with a different formulation, regimen or diet for the same disease. Thus, experiments measuring the outcome or effects of a single treatment on large numbers of people are impossible within the Ayurvedic system. In short, the double-blind placebo control method of experimentation defies Ayurvedic principles and may not bring accurate results. Is Ayurveda recognized by the World Health Organization (WHO)? The WHO recognizes Ayurveda as a traditional system of medicine. In fact, the Organization adapted its formal definition of health from Ayurvedic teachings.
  13. The ways in which people use Ayurvedic medicine are as varied as the users. Many people use it to complement or supplement their conventional Western treatments. meditationFor example, some adherents find that Ayurvedic therapies minimize the side effects of chemotherapy. Other people use rejuvenation regimens to "recharge" during the course of a chronic illness. And some follow Ayurvedic diets with the goals of eating more nutritiously, gaining energy, and maintaining a healthy weight. Still others employ Ayurveda, especially non-medical practices, to simply build and maintain greater overall physical, mental, and spiritual health. Ayurveda provides many techniques that are easily adapted into daily life, including massage, meditation, and herbal therapies. Using Ayurveda to complement western care: A case study Denise was a 58-year old female diagnosed with Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. She was undergoing chemotherapy, and her oncologist recommended seeking Ayurvedic advice on effective ways to deal with her side effects. After an exhaustive examination, Denise's Ayurvedic practitioner created a tailored diet and herbal treatment for her. After following this regimen, Denise's nausea abated and her energy increased, giving her the ability to once again enjoy her everyday routines and responsibilities.
  14. In Ayurveda, perfect health is defined as "a balance between body, mind, spirit, and social wellbeing." In fact, the twin concepts of balance and connectedness echo throughout Ayurvedic texts, thought, and practice. Like all holistic health systems, Ayurveda emphasizes the unshakable connections between the body, mind, and spirit. However, Ayurveda's connectedness extends far beyond the individual, reaching into the universal. Basic tenents include: All things in the universe, both living and nonliving, are joined together. In fact, everything in the universe is actually made of the same five gross natural elements: space, air, fire, water, and earth. There is a deep connection between the self and the environment. We are all initially connected within ourselves, to people surrounding us, to our immediate environment, and to the universe. This balanced connectivity ensures good health. We remain healthy if we retain balance, interacting with our environment in an effective and wholesome way. However, our initial balance is often disrupted by our lifestyles. Choices about diet, exercise, profession, and relationships all have the potential to create physical, emotional, or spiritual imbalances. This imbalance causes a lack of harmony, and makes us more susceptible to disease. Human beings are responsible for their choices and actions. We can attain and maintain good health if we make balanced choices that promote connectivity and harmony. What are the Ayurvedic concepts of prakruti and doshas? Ayurvedic philosophy maintains that people are born with a specific constitution, which is called the prakruti. The prakruti, established at conception, is viewed as a unique combination of physical and psychological characteristics that affect the way each person functions. Throughout life, an individual's underlying prakruti remains the same. However, one's prakruti is constantly influenced by various internal, external and environmental factors like day and night, seasonal changes, diet, lifestyle choices, and more. Ayurveda places great emphasis on prevention of illness, and recommends maintaining health through following daily and seasonal regimens which create balance. Sample prakritiAyurveda teaches that three qualities, called doshas, form important characteristics of the prakruti, or constitution. These doshas are called vata, pitta, and kapha, and they all have a specific impact on bodily functions. Adherents of Ayurvedic medicine believe that each person has an individual, "tailored" balance of the three doshas. Individual doshas are constantly "in flux," and are influenced by eating, exercising, and relating to others. Ayurvedic adherents believe that dosha imbalance produces symptoms that are related to that dosha and are different from symptoms of another dosha imbalance. (For example, if the aggressive and "hot" pitta-prominent person aggravates pitta, he/she may develop prickly rash or an acidic stomach.) Many factors can cause imbalance, including a poor diet, too much or too little physical or mental exertion, chemicals, or germs. What is the Ayurvedic approach? Whether you go to an Ayurvedic internal medicine specialist or an obstetrician, or other specialist, they will take both a preventive and curative approach. Preventive medicine This approach seeks to create and maintain health and longevity within the individual. It emphasizes defining each person's prakturi (or constitution) and creating daily and periodic regimens to support that prakturi and keep it in balance. These health routines focus on everything from diet and exercise to herbal therapies, massage, meditation, and social behavior and positive relationships. Curative medicine These treatments seek to heal an illness, which may be achieved by one or more of the following approaches: Internal measures, including shodhana (detoxification) and shamana (methods used to improve quality of life via palliative care). External measures, including snehana (oil treatments), svedana (steam therapy using herbal steam), and use of herbal pastes. Surgical methods, including removal of tissues, organs, and harmful growths Mental and spiritual therapies, called daivya chikitsa Herbal measures, including rasa shashtra (the use of various herbal and trace metal formulations)
  15. NCCIH-Funded Research NCCIH is funding research that: Builds on earlier investigations in breast cancer survivors that found a positive effect of integrated Ayurvedic medicine on improved quality of life; new research will evaluate ways to make this intervention easier to incorporate into peoples’ lives. The proposed Ayurvedic intervention includes diet, lifestyle, yoga, and pressure point treatment. Studies the mechanism by which an extract from Butea monosperma (BME) flowers may protect against joint destruction from osteoarthritis (BME is widely used in Ayurveda for arthritis and other inflammatory diseases in India). More to Consider Don’t use Ayurvedic medicine to postpone seeing a conventional health care provider about a medical problem. If you have a health condition, talk with your conventional health care provider before using Ayurvedic products. There is no significant regulation of Ayurvedic practice or education in the United States, and no state requires a practitioner to have a license. For more information on credentialing complementary health practitioners, see the NCCIH fact sheet Credentialing, Licensing, and Education. If you’re pregnant or nursing, be sure to consult your (or your child’s) health care provider as some Ayurvedic products may contain products that could be harmful. Tell all your health care providers about any complementary or integrative health approaches you use. Give them a full picture of what you do to manage your health. This will help ensure coordinated and safe care.
×
×
  • Create New...